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blinking stoplight and no movie theaters. so religion was what people did. everyone went to church, and my father was far more conservative than the average person in the town. we were not permitted to wear pants, shorts, no alcohol, no dancing, no musical instruments in our church of christ. in lots of ways i was quiet at home in saudi arabia. [laughter] i devoted my time to trying to figure this country out precisely because i think it is the one arab country that is truly strategic. not only because it is the world's largest exporter of oil, which sustains the western way of life, but because saudi arabia, i am convinced, will be critical in the ultimate resolution of what is the proper islam which is going on now between the radicals, jihadists if you will, and the more modernizing muslims. and that very battle also goes on inside saudi arabia. to try to understand this society, i knew you would like someone coming to to write a book about america, you wouldn't be able to go to washington and new york and claim to understand america. so i had to be confident that i could get outside of
is if they are going to be a sustained relationship, the teaching of the jewish religion has an institution for na, and that is marriage. because jesus as a result of the pressures on him was constantly traveling, he could not uphold the jewish law at that time which held you had to provide a woman with a household near her original family. you couldn't, for example, take a woman from galilee to judea or judea to galilee. from the town to the country side or vice versa. that is one reason for caution. >> give me the second one. 13 years old was the average age according to the jewish religion a woman becomes betrothed and that young lady was watched carefully by her parents and others to see to it that she arrived at the marriage state in a state of virgin, correct? that line was crossed. isn't that all very small academic minor green eye shade material when you are faced with the reality of this situation? >> it may be. the other factor i had in mind is mary mag ga -- magdalene's previous possession. we don't know the nature of that earlier difficulty. >> we are talking about the demons. >> exact
. in fact, there's more than enough to go around." >>> a new poll from the public religion research institute this week shows that majorities in every faith group surveyed support an immigration policy that includes an earned pathway to citizenship. a little more than 60% of the population as a whole expressed the same attitude. nearly 70% of those surveyed said the golden rule, treating others as you'd like to be treated, is an important value in shaping immigration policy. >>> gordon cosby died this week. right after world war ii in which he was a paratrooper chaplain, he founded and then led the nondenominational church of the savior in washington, d.c. in an early interview on this program, cosby spoke of how members committed themselves totally to following jesus, beginning with tithes, prayers, meditation and study. >> then out of that, we feel, comes the capacity to do that which is important to be done in the society. >> the church of the savior divided into many small groups, ministering to the poor and sick. it developed a national influence, especially on young christians
religion correspondent lauren green is here next. it's a pig fight, a family forced out of their home over their pet. the controversy behind this coming up. ♪ [ male announcer ] in blind taste tests, even ragu users chose prego. prego?! but i've bought ragu for years. [ thinking ] wonder what other questionable choices i've made? i choose date number 2! whooo! [ sigh of relief ] [ male announcer ] choose taste. choose prego. [ sigh of relief ] all right that's a fifth-floor probleok.. not in my house! ha ha ha! ha ha ha! no no no! not today! ha ha ha! ha ha ha! jimmy how happy are folks who save hundreds of dollars switching to geico? happier than dikembe mutumbo blocking a shot. get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. >> welcome back. time for your shot of the morni morning. [cat meowing] >> cats and dogs calling a truce. and the cat is herding the puppies. >> in a reversal of the natural order, it's a cat herding puppies. >> clayton: amazing, one wary dog, i don't know about this, is he leading me into a trap. this video of course -- this video h
, with all of its suffering, but also all of its salvation. it's a part of the three great religions, judism, christianity and islam that trace their origins to abraham and see jerusalem as sake red. and it's a story that has inspired communities across the globe, including me and my fellow americans. in the united states, a nation made up of people who crossed oceans to start anew were naturally drawn to the idea of finding freedom in our lands. to african americans, the story of the exodus was perhaps the central story, the most powerful image about emerging from the grip of bondage to reach for liberty and human dignity, a tale that was carried from slavery through the civil rights movement into today. for generations this promise helped people weather poverty and persecution while holding on to the hope that a better day was on the horizon. for me personally growing up in far flung parts of the world and without firm roots, the story spoke to a yearning within every human being for a ome. of course, even as we draw strength from the story of god's will and his gift of freedom expressed o
yeo economic levels within all religions and every level of education. according to the government. the united states has the worst record in industrialized nation losing five children every day to abuse death. joining me in the studio from the san francisco child abuse prevention center is katie allbright. >> thank you so much for having me around for shining the spotlight on this important issue. >>er love what the prevention does. you are celebrating an anniversary today? >> yes, we have been working in san francisco for 40 years preventing child abuse. we are very excited about our future and vision. we're here to stay and looking forward to the next 40 years. >> cheryl: this was started by a man with immense compassion for the issue? >> he was a pediatrician at general hospital and saw incidents of violence in the hospital, how in the community can come together to protect children. that inspired a man and we were able to do it for 40 years here in san francisco. >> cheryl: you have a number of
this debate and they talk about religion and the debate of same sex marriage, a lot of people the knee-jerk reaction is the bible condemns this, the bible condemns this. what do you say to that? >> well, certainly if you look for the witness scripture you're not going to find anything about gay marriage. you're going to see scattered passages about homosexuality but because it's on long-term monogamous between same sex couples, that silence we need to understand it. the bible says as much about gay marriage as it does about the internet. and we are living in a different time. and our church as a witness to couples that are very powerfully in love with each other and are witnessing in their faith. one of the things we say in the wedding ceremony in the united methodist liturgy is the couple creates a new ministry for the church. well, our congregation has been blessed by the witness of gay and lesbian couples who have been in those long-term relationships who have a deep commitment that it's about love, it's not about other things that people want to raise up around issues with scriptur
are secular in their outlook, who believe that the separation of religion from the state is the salvation of the country, that is the natural ally of the united states, not the islamic side. i think there should be more support for the politics of secularism in iraq. it would not be wrong. in fact, i would say and be necessary and highly desirable for the americans to support their natural allies, which i happen to believe represent the future of iraq and i myself am part of, at a personal level. so, there is this conflict, and this conflict is not resolved on the boards. the outcome of this will depend on how much the united states is willing to put into the right factors to get iraq moving in the right direction. if they fail, it will be very unfortunate, but the people who will pay the price will be the people of iraq and american interests in the region. >> very quickly, the european perspective on the u.s.-iraq relationship. >> i think many people looking at that relationship feel that the u.s. wants to forget about iraq, start looking at it through the rearview mirror, look beyond.
accomplished in india. we studied the role of disobedience and we studied the great religions of the world. and when it was time for the young people to sit in, we did. many of us use nonviolence not simply as a technique or but it as a way of life in the way of living. we wanted as dr. king was there the soul of america to create a beloved community. you heard in the introduction i did get arrested a few times. 40 times. during the 60s but since i've been in congress i got arrested four more times around the issues of south africa and around what was going on in sudan. but we never gave up during those days. we never gave in. them. we never gave out in spite of being beaten, left bloody and unconscious, having a concussion on that ridge. i still believe in the power of love. i still believe that somehow and some way we can overcome. we can create one community, one family, one house if we all live in the same house. not just an american house but the world house. it doesn't matter we are there we are lack, white latino asian-america or native american we must stay with our house and hold
and religion." we grant them power. we protect them. they do not make us free. as long as we have the second amendment, we always will be. ourre america and politicians are only as powerful as we the people will allow. the latest from the nra, again focusing on guns, background checks. a look at guns and video games in our country. of course, front and center, following what happened in newtown, conn. last december. the hearst newspaper focusing on all of these issues, this writing -- chronicle," exploring one aspect of our culture, the prevalence of violence in our media. read some of the opinions available online. a lot of people weighing in on all of this. brian joins us from sterling heights, michigan. morning. caller: how are you? host: fine, thank you. caller: excellent. video games, as long as a , let thes a scapegoat parents raise the kids. back in the 1980's and 1990's anytime someone killed someone they blamed metal music. it is the same thing here. someone was out, they start shooting at people -- people play video games. he played video games. that is what it is. no. it starts at
of religion and freedom of the press. secondly, it is the economics and the bonds that bind us together. the united states represent about one fourth of the world's gross domestic product. the nations of europe represent more. nato is about 50% of the gdp. it is $4 trillion per year across the atlantic. so i think the transatlantic connection has an important economic component as well. third, geography does matter. sometimes people say to me, they are the bastions of the cold war. i would counter by saying that it's not. they are forward operating bases in the 21st century. they allow us to extend support from eucom in that area as well. fourth, i would say that nato would serve together around the world is a wide variety of missions that we can talk about this morning. fifth and finally, nowhere else in the world will we find such an elite and capable group of allies who have the technology, the training, the levels to help us. we need to encourage our european partners to spend more on defense. i do that consistently, i'm glad to talk about that today. but i do believe these connecti
don't believe everything should be put up to a sproept freedom to speech, freedom of religion, freedom to smaer not something we take votes on. it belongs to all of us under the constitution and that is why we have court. >> freedom to marry belongs to everyone, but what marriage is, you're talking about redefining marriage. >> marriage is not defined by who's denied it. >> this isn't "cross fire." i want to end with you. go ahead. >> an odd way to think about constitutional law to sap that the court should refrain from deciding whether something is constitutional or not, even if it would be advantageous for the nation as a whole to have the conversation continue in politics. the court is a passive body. it doesn't get to decide whether to take a case, also doesn't get to decide once a case is befores it, granted review to punt on that case simply because the politician conversation vo continue. something is either constitutional or it's not. >> and they are constitution. >> it's difficult to predict what the high court lieutenant do -- will do in a case like this, based on obama care.
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12